Wednesday, February 1, 2012

The Wanderings of Odysseus Blog 2

The chapters "Telemachus Seeks His Father" through "The Phaeacian Games" takes place after Odysseus has lost all his men.  Considering the events and the characters who experience the events, is this section of the novel about hope or is it about despair? Respond both individually and to at least one other person's response.  Be sure to use evidence from the novel to support your answer.

95 comments:

Anonymous said...

Those chapters are mostly about hope because Athene tells Telemachus that his father is alive. This is also about hope because Hermes tells th nymph Calyspo to let Odysseus go. Odysseus is the hopeful to get on his way yet again. Odysseus also greets hope when he meets the princess Nausicaa and is taken cake of by her and her family. There is also a small part of despair when the boat Odysseus made on Calyso's island sinks and Odysseus is then saved by the sea godess.

Sydney Shelton

Esther DelliQuadri said...

I think this both because when Odysseus is stuck on the island he is full of dispair and doesn't think he will ever see is home or family again. Also, is home, family and wife are so full of dispair his mother dies of greif. I think eventually it is hope when Calypso bids him farewell and helps him build a boat he is full of hope and when the gods help is family find him they are full of hope.

Esther DelliQuadri said...

Dear Sydeny,
I half agree with you because I think it is true that mst of it is hope but that there is also lots of dispair in the beginning.

Mea fisher said...

I think these chapters are are mostly about hope because the gods want to help oddyseus get back to his home. Each time he washes up on shore someone helps him also. Calypso also eventualy lets him off the island.

Mea Fisher

Anonymous said...

Esther,
I understand why you responded the way you did. Altough your response in convincing, I still hold that the last few chapters were most hopeful.
Sydney S.

Mea fisher said...

Esther, I agree with you completly with everything you said about how it is both hope and despair. because he is sad when he is on the island but happy when he leaves.

Anonymous said...

I think that it is a little bit about both. Because when Odyseus is stuck on the island he doesn't think that he will ever see his family again or even get home. On top of that, his wife dies of grief it says in the novel because of pure sadness.I also think that it is hope because when Calypso helps Odyseus build a boat and says goodbye to him, Odyseus is full of hope that he will dfind his family and finally get home.
Matthew white

Anonymous said...

Sydney, I agree with what you said about hope. However, I also think that there is a little bit of despair because when Odyseus thinks that he will never see his family again he is full of dispair. Besides that, you did a very good job.
Matthew white

Anonymous said...

Sydney, I agree with what you said about hope. However, I also think that there is a little bit of despair because when Odyseus thinks that he will never see his family again he is full of dispair. Besides that, you did a very good job.
Matthew white

Anonymous said...

These chapters are about hope because they are when things start going right for Odysseus. He gets off Calypso's island, gets help from the princess, king, and queen, and Athene watches over him and gives him help the whole time. All of these things give him hope because good things haven't happened in a while and he starts to feel like he might actually make it home.
-Margaret L.

Anonymous said...

Matt,
I think it was his mom that died, but that's still sad, so I guess that would be grief, and also what you said about him being on the island for so long. I didn't really think about that begining part so I agree with you. But, overall, I think the chapters were much more hopeful than despairing.
-Margaret L.

Anonymous said...

It is about hope when he doesn't think he will see his family again and it is despair when he is saved by the sea goddess. I think it is about both.

scotty beee

Anonymous said...

sydney,
I agree with you completely when the sea goddess saves him it is despair and I also agree with you that he is hopeful and it is mostly hope.

scotty beeee

Anonymous said...

I think these chapters are about both hope and despair. Telemachus is hopeful when Athene tells him his father is alive. It is also hopeful for Odysseus is able to get off of Calypso's Island, meets the princess, and gets helped by the sea goddess. The despair in this chapter happens when Odysseus thinks he will never leave the island, and when his boat sinks.
Julia Wong

Anonymous said...

Mea,
I agree with you because these chapters are mainly about hope. Odysseus does get a lot of help from the gods, and he finally gets let off the island. The only thing I think differently though is that there is a little despair, also.

Anonymous said...

That last one was from Julia Wong.

Surina Techarukpong said...

I think that it is about hope and despair. It is hopeful because Telemachus gets new home from Athene and he sets out on a quest to find him. I think Odysseus' side of the story is mostly full of depair because he is stranded all alone. But, the good news is is that he is saved and taken care of for a safe journey home. I think that both options happen many times in the story and it would be hard to choose either over the other.

Anonymous said...

I Think it is about showing how you can still have hope in the middle of despair. He has despair because all his men are dead and he is stuck on Calypso's island. But even though he goes through all that he still believes he can return to his wife in Ithaca. You can tell because Calypso looks at him and says I can tell you wish to return to your home because all you do is sit out and look with longing at the sea. It also shows hope when Telemachus is told by Athene that his father is still alive; and even through all the despair of tyrants trying to take over his throne he can still believe that.
JV

Surina Techarukpong said...

Scotty beee,

I agree with you about both but I dont understand how him getting saved is despair. If I were to get saved I would be hopeful. But, overall I agree with you on the part about having both hope and despair.

Anonymous said...

Esther,
Your comment is perfect. When Calypso finally decides to let him go he gets a giant spark of hope that he will see his land, his family, and his friends once more in Ithaca.
JV

Anonymous said...

I think that Odysseus gets both hope and despair in these chapters. throughout the entire book, he has hope inside of him, some times more than others. But greif comes into his heart very often also,like when all of his men die. I think getting to the land where the princess is gives him lots more hope than he had before though.
NICK SIMON

erik summers said...

I think most of this is hope. I think this because Calypso lets him off the island, and the gods seem pretty determined to help Odysseus return to his home. However, some is despair, because he is sad and scared that he wil never see his home again.

erik summers said...

Mea,
I completely agree with you. I thought your response was very good.

Anonymous said...

MATT, I agree completely with what you said. He went through some really tough times which had to put a lot of despair in him. But he also didnt give up, which means he must have had hope.
NICK SIMON

Sydney B said...

This section in this book has both hope as well as despair. This section starts off in despair when Odysseus is on the island with Calypso and can't return home, when his mom back at his home dies of grief, and when his wife Penelope is missing him. The section turns a corner however, when Athene looks down and helped these situations. She brings in hope when she turns into Mentes and talks to Telemachus, and tells him to look for his father. When Odysseus arrives at the new island, he gets treated well and has hope to return home. This section of the book startes out with despair and turns into hope.

Sydney B said...

Surina,
I agree with you about the part you say hope and despair happen at many times throughout the story. I wouldn't say though, that Odysseus' side of the story is all full of despair, because he regains hope at Phaeacia. Telemachus' side also encounters despair when he sees his mom getting pushed down by all the suitors. Overall, I agree mostly with what you said.

Anonymous said...

I think these chapters were about hope and despair. It is full of despair when Odysseus is trapped on the island and is starting to think that he will never again see his wife or family. Also it is sad when Odysseus's mother dies because she misses him so much. The way that the chapters are full of hope is because the god Hermes nicely tells the nymph Calyspo to let Odysseus off the island and to get on his way back to his family.

Andrew M.

Anonymous said...

I think those chapters are mostly about hope. When Athene visits Telemachus and send him to his fathers friends and eventually he finds out his father is alive. Also when Odysseus leaves Calypso's island he is full of hope for his home land. Also when Ino comes to his aid at sea that creates hope where there was then despaire from the storm. When the kings daughter finds and helps him it gives him hope that he will come home someday even though all his men are dead. These all show moments that are hopeful for the future.

Cole G.

Anonymous said...

Nick,
I agree with you when you said that there are parts in the book where Odysseus is full of despair. Then when is embarks on his journey back to Ithaca, he is rejuvenated with a new hope.

Andrew M.

Anonymous said...

JV
I agree that hope shines through all the despair that weighs on him. He is some how still able to continue through deep despair when most would give up. All his men ard dead but still goes on trying to get home. This has payed off though. His hope is inspiring to all in Phaeacians he meets and they are happy to hellp him.

Cole G.

Patrick Dillon said...

I think these chapters have both despair and hope in them. But they have more hope than despair. Odysseus had despair when he was longing to escape from Calypso's island and journey back to Ithica.
In the chapter, The King's Daughter, Odysseus has more hope than despair. He knows that the goddess Athene is on his side. And when the princess takes him and introduces him to the king and queen he knows that he is on a good path when they show hospitality and generosity to him. They provide him with food, and shelter.

Patrick Dillon said...

Andrew,

I agree with you but in my opinion there is more hope than despair. We have to consider that there is more good sides of the story than just Hermes telling Calypso to let Odysseus go. He was also shown hospitality to in the chapter, The King's Daughter when the king and queen took him in.

Anonymous said...

I think that the section is mostly about hope but also about despair it was about hope when he was saved by the sea lady and was washed upon an inhabited island that gave him food water shelter and a ship back to ithica. Also there was dispair when posidon sent the storm to wreck his small ship after he had been ship wrecked multiple times before by posidon.

Bryan Gilbertson:)

Anonymous said...

Dear sydney,
I agree with you that the section is mostly about hope , but it is also about a little of dispair when his ship gets wrecked

Bryan Gilbertson

Anonymous said...

I think these chapters have a little bit of both mixed in because when Odysseus is stuck on the island he is full of despair because he thinks he will never get back to his homeland, and he is hopeful because Athene tells Telemachus Odysseus is alive which make Telemachus hopeful his father is going to make it back.
Channing Conner

Anonymous said...

Esther
I agree with you that these chapters are full of hope and despair. I agree with you about how it is despair and Odysseus doesn't think he will get off of the island and I it is hope when the gods help his family.
Channing Conner

Anonymous said...

Esther
I agree with you that these chapters are full of hope and despair. I agree with you about how it is despair and Odysseus doesn't think he will get off of the island and I it is hope when the gods help his family.
Channing Conner

Anonymous said...

Odysseus seems to have the same feelig as the same as his belove family; they are all i despair thinking they wil never see eachother again. but he seems to have hope when he sees princess Nausicaa. So I hope the odessus finds hope and I belive that he will have more hope now that he has been saved by the sea godess

Lyta Foulk

Anonymous said...

Dear Sydney,
You are right about the hope thing . Because if there was no hope then the story would end. but there is so much grief that it dims the hopefulness that they have left.

Lyta Foulk

Lindy Pittman said...

I believe the chapters are mostly about hope with a little bit of despair. For example, when Odysseus is with Calypso he is full of despair, but when he leaves he is happy until he hears the songs about the Trojan War. His family is also sad, but then Athene tells Odysseus' son that Odysseus is alive and the family stops being sad. So overall I believe that it is a lot of happy with a little sad.

Anonymous said...

These chapters are about both hope and dispare. Odysseus is dispareing because he is on the island and doesn't think he will ever see his family again. Back home Odysseus' Mother is so sad that she dies. The hope comes when Calypso comes To say fairwell and helps him build a boat.There is even more hope when he gods help his family find him.
Kelly Ryan

Lindy Pittman said...

Dear Sydney,
I totally agree with you except I believe that when Hermes told Calypso she had to let Odysseus go she was truly sad and loved Odysseus. that was a bittersweet moment in my eyes and I do not consider it a happy time. Other than that i completely agree with you.

Anonymous said...

Dear Sydney,
I kinda agree with you because there is hope but there is lots of dispare at the beginning.
Kelly Ryan

Anonymous said...

i think that tis section of the book is about hope, because Telemachus thinks that his father is alive. Also Odysseus is going on his way home. I think that both of their storise are about Hope because they are about to meet again. None of these chapters are ful of dispair.

Nolan Sankey

Anonymous said...

Sydney

I agree with you the chapters are all about hope. There is no dispair in any part. Tememachus knows his father is alive. Odysseus is on his way home. This is a happy part of the story.

Nolan Sankey

Charlie H. said...

I think that these chapters are about both. I think that they are a bout hope because Odysseus's son goes to Menelaus to get information about where his father is, and it would give him hope. It is also about desperation becuase one of the main reasons why his son goes searching for him in the first place is (besides that Athena tod him to) that his mother was getting bombarded by the young men who said that she had to remarry or they wouldn't leave the palace. So it is abot both.

Charlie H. said...

Dear Sydney,
I agree that there is hope in the chapters, but I also believe that there is despair too. I think this becuase besides Athena telling Telemachus to search for his father, he needed to either become king, have his mom remarry (which noone liked), or look for his dad to come home. I also disagree with what you said about how it is hopeful when Calypso lets Odysseus go. I think this because she loved him and was sad to see him go, and it was also an a ct of desperation to have Hermes tell her to let him go.

Maura G. said...

I think these chapters are about both hope and despair. I think it is about despair when Oddysseus is trapped on the island and doesn't think he will ever be home. It is also about despair when Calypso is keeping him there because she is so hopeless. It turns to hope when Calypso finally lets go and helps him build a boat and sail home. It is also is about hope when the gods are trying to help him.

Maura

Anonymous said...

I think that these chapters are mainly about hope. Odysseus is given a chance to get back to his home country by the gods, and this is a good omen. It also gives hope because Telemachus is informed that his father is still alive and well, and sets about to find him. Everybody is given good hopes when Odysseus reveals his identity at the country of Phraecia, and many gifts are given to him. He is sent away with many great gifts and a ship to take him home.
-Connor Frasier

Jack Starkey said...

I think that these chapters are about hope and despair. It is about despair because when hes stranded at sea, he relizes he might never see his wife and child again. But I think these chapters are mostly about hope. Odysseus gains hope when he is released from Calyspos island. He also gains hope when he is rescued by the princess Nausicaa. He is fed well and treated fairly and eventually he is on his way.

Jack Starkey

Anonymous said...

Scotty Beeeeeeee,
I liked your response. It was very complete. It really gave me a good understanding of what happened in the chapters. It also helped me understand what parts were hopeful and what were despairing parts.
-Connor Frasier

Anonymous said...

I think that the chapters are about hope. the previous chapters are abotu despair. now he has found a kind people and has found a way home.
~~RYLAN~~

Jack Starkey said...

Connor F,
I totally agree with all the points you made. They are all good examples of how hope and dispair are shown in the chapters.

Jack Starkey

Anonymous said...

Those chapters are about hope. Athene tells Telemachus that his father is alive. oddysey also hopes to get away from the island. The sea god is hopeful that oddysey will do good because she saves him.

Will F.

Anonymous said...

Jake,
I will agree with you when you post your comment. I also think he is happy and stuff and also the games are pretty chill so yeah.
~~RYLAN~~

Anonymous said...

Rylan, i agree with you, i also think you are right that the previous chapters are about despair.

Will F.

Anonymous said...

i think that there is mainly hope explained in these chapters. i think this becuase oddysseus gains hope when he meets the princess. also when he gets a boat built so he could get off that island. i think this chapter has dispare, but more hope.
Joe DeLine

Anonymous said...

I think it's kind of both. So yes.

Jake Crouch

Ok so when he's chillin on that island he's all sad and stuff. Now when his son tries to find him his son gets all hapy and stuff. Then the games are just chill and he's happy.

I totally agree with Nolan. Almost all of the chapters are about hope with only little sad.

Jake Crouch

Jack Craig said...

I think that in the chapter: Telemachus Seeks His Father, a lot about the chapter is describing Odysseus's sadness and longing for his home. In that chapter, Odysseus is very sad that he is trapped on the island, and is remoresful that he has lost all of his crew. However, in this chapter there is hope. When Athena told hermes to talk to calypso and convince her to let Odysseus go, then there is hope for Odysseus. Also, Telemachus is now searching for his father across the seas for him.
In the chapter:The Phaecian Games, It is mostly describing how Odysseus has hope. The people of the island welcome him and love him. He tells them that he is Odysseus in the end, and they are shocked. They then fill a ship with goods and food for his voyage home.

Anonymous said...

connor, i agree with your comment totally. we both think that it was mainly about hope. your comment showed me there is even more hope than i thought!\
Joe DeLine

Anonymous said...

I think both hope and dispair are demonstrated in these chapters. For example when Odysseus is stuck on the island, and Calypso isn't offering him any help to leave and return home he is feeling dispair, because he feels that he will never reach ithica. Latert he feels hope when Hermes tells Calypso to let him go and she helps him get on his way. I feel that his emotions change throughout this section.
Nikki

Jack Craig said...

To Dr. Starkey
I agree with your comment.
I like how you showed the contrast between the two chapters and the nuianses that are shown in the chapter.

Anonymous said...

I think that at first it might seem to be a lot of despair in the chapters but the despair leads Odysseus to have hope. When Odysseus is stranded on Calypso's island he doesn't think he will ever get home but when Hermes tell's Calypso to let him go, he has hope again. I think that the Phaeacians really give him hope when they gave him the ship and all the goods for his voyage home. After getting out of Calypso's island I think it is mainly about hope.
Lark

Anonymous said...

Nikki,
I agree that this part of the book is mixed emotions. I also think that when Hermes goes to Calypso's Island, Odysseus has a ton of home because he thinks that he might actually escape the island and eventually get home ti Ithica.
Lark

Anonymous said...

Joe,
I agree with your comment, because there is a lot of hope shown when the Gods help him on his way home. But I think that there is also dispair and frustration when he thinks that he wont get home. So, I understand your point of view thinking that it is mostly hope, but I think that there is also some dispair.
Nikki

Anonymous said...

I think thesse chapters are about hope with a litle bit of despair. Mostly hope because Athene tells Telemachus that his father is alive. It is despair because when Odysseus is stuck on the island he doesnt think he will see his family again. But when Calypso helps him build a boat he is happy again because he truly beleives he will go home.
~Kaylie R.

Maura G. said...

Dear Sydney S,
I agreee with your comment completely. I believe that it is hope when Telemachus knows that his father is alive, when Calypso lets him go, and when Odyssues meets princess Nausicaa. I believe it is despair when the boat sinks, he is stuck on the island, and he has to find his way home. All in all, I agree with your comment, just with a few alterations.

Maura

Anonymous said...

I believe for the most part that it is a section of despair. Odysseus gets washed up on Calypso's island and is stuck there for a few years, being held captive by Calypso. The entire time that he is stuck on Calypso's island he is grieving over not being on his own land. To make things worse, Calypso is madly in love with Odysseus and begins to grieve herself when told by Hermes that she had to let him leave. The day that Odysseus leaves Calypso's island he is overwhelmed with joy, wich is one of few happy things that happens in this section of the book. Sadly though Odysseus's small ship is smashed to pieces just miles from land that he reconizes. Lucky for him though that a goddess helped get the shore, where he was ment by a few maidens from the island and helped him out deerly, and now he is back home but unaware of what he is about to meet on his own soil. So for the most part Odysseus had quite a bit of bad luck but he has also been lucky.
Will McConnell

Tess Richey said...

I think these chapters are about the transition from hope to despair. At first both Odysseus and Telemachus are overwhelmed with despair, Odysseus because of the loss of his men and Telmachus is upset with the loss of his father. Then they regain hope when Telemachus hears news of his father and Odysseus is released from Calypso's island he is filled with hope at the idea of returning home. So it is definetly about the transition between the two.

Tess Richey

Tess Richey said...

Lark

I totally agree with you, these chapters are most definetly about the combination of the two. At first more despair then hope.

Tess Richey

Anonymous said...

I think that Odysseus first becomes hopeful when Hermes tells Calypso that Odysseus must be set free. After he sets off there is only a little bit of despair in them when Odysseus' boat sinks. However, he is saved by the sea goddess, Ino, and lands safely on Phaeacia. Then he is discovered by Nausica who takes care of him and agrees to help him get home. I think the greatest amount of hope is in Telamachus when he finds out that his father, Odysseus, is still alive.
Tanner S.

Anonymous said...

I think the chapters are mostly about hope. I think this because though it is sad, Odysseus is the only survivor of his crew, and that is an event that makes his future seem brighter. I also think it is about hope beacuse the gods are on his side. Without the support of the gods, Odysseus would have surly died. Lastly, he continuesly is given second chances. I think his outlook shows some hope!
Meg A

Anonymous said...

Tess,
I like how you stated that it was a transition between hope and deapair. I also agree with you that he is hopeful to go home when he leaves Calypso's island. However, he does fall into despair again when his ship is sunk in the storm. The only other chance to get home is when he washes up on Phaeacia. Overall, I agree with you that it switches off between hope and despair.
Tanner S.

Anonymous said...

Julia,
I agree that Odysseus is in despair when his ship is wretched when he is so close to being home and I also agree that he is given hope when the sea-goddess helps him. If you look at it that way, the whole experience of being wretched and recued is a hopeful thing. I think that because it shows he has the gods on his side and he has another try.
Meg

Anonymous said...

I think these chapters are about both hope and despair. There is despair when Odysseus thinks he will never get off the island or more importantly, home. His boat also sinks. Then, Odysseus was hopeful when he met the princess and got a ship to get home. Telemachus was also hopeful when Athene told him that his father was still alive.

Anonymous said...

The last comment was by Gillian Cook!

Anonymous said...

Dear Kaylie,
I think there is a little more than a little bit of despair. His boat does sink, even though he’s hopeful about coming home. At the end I don’t think that the despair overpowers the hope but they are equal.
~Gillian C.

Peter Rosenthal said...

I think that there is some despair, and some hope. It is despair because he never thinks he is going to get home. But it is hope because when Calyso helps him build a boat, it makes him happy.
~Peter R

Peter Rosenthal said...

Matt,
Wow, I totally agree with you. I can't believe that we said almost the same thing, even though I didn't even look at your post until now.
~Peter R

Peter Rosenthal said...

Will McConnell,
You are such an over achiever. You have a 26 line answer.
~Peter R

Anonymous said...

Dear Esther,
I completely agree with you. Odysseus has been through many rough times in the last fw chapters but he has also been very lucky. Odysseus seems to always, no matter what, wash up on another island and get help from the people live on the island. On the other hand Odysseus has been very unlucky. All of his men have died and he has gone through like ten ships. Now that he is finally home and happy he has to face yet another challenge, all the angry men who are destroying his kingdom. He also doesn't know that his son is out at sea looking for him so were just going to have to wait and see how this book ends.
Will McConnell

Grant a said...

I think that all of thesechapters are about hope because they are when things start going right for Odysseus. Once he gets off Calypso's island, Athena watches over him and gives him help the entire time. This all gives him hope because good things haven't happened in a long time. He also finally starts to feel like he might actually make it back home to his wife that he mourns for.

Grant A.

Grant A said...

Cole G.
I completly agree with you. You had some very good examples like how you talked about the sea goddess. There Was also another good thought that you put in about how Athene visits Telemachus. Overall it was very good and I agreed completely with you.

Grant A.

Anonymous said...

I think these chapters are about both, because they are about hope coming out of despair. There is much despair when all the rest of his men are killed, but he gains hope when he meets Calypso, and then again when he is freed from her. This story is all about despair, and then hope, which then turns to despair, which then becomes hope and so on.

Melissa Requist

Anonymous said...

JV -
I agree with you completely. I think that that is the moral of this story and that all the events that occur are just to prove that hope can still exist, even during a time of despair.

Melissa Requist

Logan Sankey said...

I think that the chapters following Odysseus being the sole survivor from his ship are about hope because he is alive. He recieves a lot of help from gods and godesses along the way and it shows that there is still hope for him to survive. Because he has gained the favor of Athena and other mortals there is little chance that he will be unable to reach his home and succed in whatever awaits him there. When he is released from Calypso's island there is a lot of hope because Odysseus believes that he might be able to finally see Penelope and his son again. There is also hope when Athena talks to Telemachus because it shows that Odysseus lives.
Logan

Logan Sankey said...

Mea, I agree with what you said about the gods helping him and when he lands on islands he is accepted and helped. The only dark spot is that Posidon is angry with him and he is mostly traveling by sea, but I think that for the most part the story is hopeful because not all is lost.
Logan

Logan Sankey said...

Mrs Craig,
I looked today after school to make sure that my coments posted, but when I got on I saw that they didn't. I wasn't sure what you wanted me to do so I just posted them again.
Logan

Anonymous said...

I think these chapters were about hope and despair. It is full of despair when Odysseus is trapped on the island and is starting to think that he will never again see his wife or family. Also it is sad when Odysseus's mother dies because she misses him so much. The way that the chapters are full of hope is because the god Hermes nicely tells the nymph Calyspo to let Odysseus off the island and to get on his way back to his family.
JAckson ernst

Raleigh Darcy said...

I think it is mostly about hope. Odysseas gets help from the princess, king, and queen. Athene tells Telemachus that his dad is alive, and Odysseas gets off the island, while athene is watching over him and helping him.
Raleigh Darcy

Raleigh Darcy said...

I agree with Meg,
I think these chapters were mostly about hope also, it did have despair but their was usually hope. He just started having things work out for him and athene was helping him the whole time.
Raleigh Darcy

Anonymous said...

This part of the book is about Hope. Telemachus goes out in hope to find his father, which Athene tells him that Odysseus is indeed alive. Odysseus is also hopeful, which encourages him to continue on and see his family again.

Tyler H.

Anonymous said...

Grant,

I agree. This is where Odysseus starts having luck and he is filled with hope again.

Tyler H.

Max Gamber said...

I think that it was more hope than despair. In "Telemachus Seeks His Father", it is mainly about despair because Odysseus misses his home. Towards the end of the chapter he has more hope because he is leaving the island and he hopes to see his home. In "The Phaeacian Games", there is no despair but all hope because Odysseus is very close to home and he is happy.

MAX GAMBER

Max Gamber said...

Tyler- I agree with you. These chapters revolved around hope. Odysseus has hope to find his home and Telemachus has hope to find Odysseus.

MAX GAMBER